AFTER GETTING TYPE 1 TESTED,

make a plan
for the future

The Type 1 Test looks for diabetes-related autoantibodies to detect type 1 diabetes (T1D) before there are any symptoms. Learn what your results mean for you below.

If 2 or more autoantibodies are present

If The Type 1 Test detects 2 or more autoantibodies, you are likely already in the early stages of T1D, but there is action you can take now.

Learn the symptoms of T1D

Now that you know that you or your child is likely in the early stages of T1D, you can be on the lookout for symptoms before they appear. Some symptoms to watch out for are:

  • Excessive thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Bed-wetting in children who previously didn’t wet the bed at night
  • Extreme hunger
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Irritability and other mood changes
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Blurred vision

Monitor blood sugar

Monitoring blood sugar is one way to keep track of T1D. That’s because in the early stages of the disease, even though there may be no visible symptoms, blood sugar levels start to become abnormal. That’s how you know T1D is progressing. You can work with your healthcare provider to check you or your child’s blood sugar.

Partner with the right healthcare provider

Endocrinologists and diabetes nurse educators are diabetes experts. They can guide you on the best treatments and ways to manage T1D. There are also pediatric endocrinologists that treat children living with T1D.

Stay ahead of the learning curve

From understanding how food affects blood sugar to learning about insulin delivery systems, there can be a steep learning curve when it comes to managing T1D. You can take the time now to start educating yourself and your family. That way, when T1D symptoms appear, you’ll be able to walk into a diagnosis with confidence.

Did you know?

Ongoing research is being done in the field of T1D. That’s why it’s so important to know your T1D status. If testing confirms you’re in the early stages of T1D, ask your doctor what options may be available to you.

If 1 autoantibody is present

If The Type 1 Test detects one autoantibody, you are at a higher risk for developing T1D. You or your child should continue to get screened every year to see if additional autoantibodies develop.

If no autoantibodies are present

If The Type 1 Test detects no autoantibodies, you may want to consider getting rescreened every year if you have a family history of T1D.

Illustration of family history of T1D and need for rescreening every year Illustration of family history of T1D and need for rescreening every year